Nautical Accidents 2006

10/01/06 ? T-39N VT-86 USN 11:00 aircraft crashed in Georgia, after being overdue from a training mission
12/01/06 ? T-34C VT-27 USN 09:26 In Texas aircraft had an engine failure and forced to make a no power landing in a field.
18/01/06 ? F/A-18C VFA-97 USMC 18:30, At El Centro NAF, the aircraft crashed during a night bombing training mission.
26/01/06 ? AV-8B VMAT-203 USMC 13:05 hrs During a vertical landing at MCAS Cherry Point, the aircraft had a hard landing
27/01/06 ? T-34C VT-27 USN 09:47 at Waldron, the aircraft crashed into the back yard of a house near the airfield.
28/01/06 164642 / NK-404 F/A-18C VFA-25 USN 09:40 Whilst landing on CVN-76 USS Ronald Reagan the aircraft struck the ramp and went over the side of the ship. Accident happened in Australian waters.
02/02/06 12438 CH-124 ? CAF

HALIFAX (CP) -- Five crew were plucked from the ocean off Denmark on Thursday after a Sea King helicopter crashed while practising night  landings on a Canadian destroyer. A navy official in Halifax said the crewmen were treated on HMCS Athabaskan for "very minor injuries" but were otherwise fine. "Everyone is A-OK," Cmdr. Chris Dickinson said in an interview from the ship. "An exciting evening. The kind we don't want to see." It wasn't known if the crash was caused by mechanical failure or a mistake by the chopper's pilots as they tried to land on the ship's stern on a dark but clear night. Dickinson said the Sea King tried initially to land on the warship, but flew off to try again. It was making a second pass when it went suddenly into the water. The crew was able to get out of the aircraft "within seconds" and were being examined by doctors on the ship within 10 minutes of the crash. Dickinson said the Sea King flipped onto its back in the water, stayed afloat for a few moments, then sank to the bottom. "At this point we don't know why the incident occurred, but we will be investigating," said Lieut. Sonia Connock, a navy spokesperson in Halifax. The crash occurred about 50 kilometres off the eastern coast of Denmark while the Halifax-based destroyer was deployed with a NATO fleet. Defence officials, in a brief release, said an attempt would be made to hoist the chopper from 16 metres of water, pending sea conditions. Col. Al Blair, commander of the Sea King squadron at Shearwater air base near Halifax, said at a news conference later that military investigators were preparing to go to crash site. He was asked if the incident was being regarded as a crash or a controlled ditching. "Ditching can be either," Blair replied. "There's controlled ditching and uncontrolled -- and at this point we don't know which it was. "We do know it rolled over [in the water] very quickly." Blair said the crew's training helped avoid serious injury. "We train for this eventuality," he said. "We have breathing apparatus on the aircraft. We're trained to exit from an inverted aircraft." The Athabaskan is deployed with the Standing NATO Maritime Group 1, a squadron consisting of destroyers and frigates from the alliance nations. The Canadian destroyer, the flagship for the group, carries a crew of about 300 people. Dickinson said the loss of the chopper wouldn't affect the ship's
mission. The accident is the latest in a long string of problems for the Sea Kings, the navy's geriatric workhorses which were purchased in the
1960s. The federal government is buying 28 Cyclones to replace the Sea King fleet, but the first aircraft won't be delivered until late 2008 and operations won't begin for another year. The last Sea King is expected to retire in 2011. In 1993, the newly elected Liberal government of Jean Chrétien cancelled an order that would have replaced the Sea Kings by 2000, saying it was too expensive. Canada's fleet of Sea Kings have been involved in four fatal crashes that have claimed at least 10 lives over the years. They require about 30 hours of maintenance for every hour of flying time. Only 27 of the original fleet of 50 Sea Kings remain after this crash. The accident off Denmark mirrors one off Halifax in September 2004. A Sea King was practising landings on the deck of HMCS Iroquois when there was an imbalance in the amount of power the engines were producing. The sudden shift caused the aircraft to fall more than a metre to the ship's deck. None of the crew was injured.

06/02/06 ? F/A-18D VFA-125 USN A fighter jet pilot was rescued after ejecting from his plane as it crashed
into the water near a naval air station, authorities said Monday. The pilot, who was not immediately identified, ejected from the Navy F/A-18 Hornet jet and was picked up by a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter, said Lt. Cmdr Chris O'Neil, spokesman for the 7th Coast Guard District in Miami. The pilot, who was the only person aboard the jet, was taken to Lower Keys Memorial Hospital, where he was in good condition, Navy spokeswoman Gretchen Eddy said. "He was happy to be picked up out of the water," said Jim Brooks, a Navy spokesman. The plane crashed about five nautical miles south of Boca Chica in the Florida Keys, O'Neil said The jet had taken off from the nearby Naval Air Station Key West and was returning to the station after training when it crashed, Brooks said. The naval station provides air combat training for pilots, who train for aerial combat missions in Iraq and elsewhere, said Lt. Herb Josey, a Navy spokesman at the Pentagon.
17/02/06 ? CH-53 ? USMC Ten still missing in US helicopter crash off Djibouti U.S. and allied forces searched on Saturday for 10 crew members still missing a day after two Marine Corps helicopters crashed off the coast of Djibouti, the hub of U.S. counterterrorism operations in the Horn of Africa. "We always have hope of finding survivors," U.S. military spokeswoman Major S.A. Romano told Reuters by phone from the tiny Red Sea state. Two crew members rescued by the Djiboutian military on Friday were in a stable condition, said a statement from Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, the U.S. operation set up in Djibouti in 2002. Italian, French, British forces were also taking part in the search and rescue operation, Romano said. The statement said the cause of the crash was not yet known, but also referred to it as an accident. CNN television news, quoting U.S. officials, earlier said there was no reason to believe hostile fire was involved. "The weather at the time of the mishap was reported to be partly cloudy ...with light to variable winds and unlimited visibility," the military statement said. The helicopters were on a two-hour training mission in northern Djibouti at the time of the crash. Each of the CH-53 marine transport helicopters was carrying six crew members. Since December 2002, the former French colony has allowed U.S. troops to use it as a base from which to hunt militants in Djibouti itself and in Somalia, Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya and Yemen.
17/02/06 ? CH-53 ? USMC As Above
21/02/06 ? F/A-18 VMFA-122 USMC An F/A-18 Hornet based at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, S.C., crashed into coastal waters near Key West, Fla., around 5 p.m. Tuesday, according to a Marine Corps release. The pilot of the aircraft, assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 122,  ejected safely and was recovered from the water by Navy search-and-rescue personnel, said air station spokeswoman Capt. Sara Kansteiner. She declined to release the name or rank of the pilot, but said the Marine was taken to an undisclosed medical facility and is "in good condition. "She said the pilot was conducting, "routine training."  Investigators are looking into the cause of the crash , according to the  release.
04/03/06 ? EA-6B VAQ-135 USN Whidbey crew safely eject before Navy jet goes down. A Navy jet crashed in the remote north-eastern corner of Oregon during a routine training mission Friday but all four crew members on board survived, officials said. The EA-6B Prowler from the Naval Air Station at Whidbey Island crashed north of Pendleton near the Washington border just before 11:30 a.m., according to the Navy and Umatilla County officials in Pendleton. All crew members ejected safely, said Kimberly Martin, a Navy spokeswoman at Whidbey Island. The cause of the accident was under investigation. The plane was flying at low altitude but there is ³not typically anything in the area that perhaps it would have hit,² said Cheryl Seigal, spokeswoman for the Umatilla County Sheriff¹s Office. Plagued by a series of helicopter and jet crashes in recent months, the Navy said Friday that it will ground all its aircraft for half a day next week for an internal safety review.
31/03/06 163313 / E-156 TH-57B HT-8 USN Repairable?
12/05/06 165596 / CG-05 AV-8B+ VMA-231 USMC Overran on landing at Farmingdale Republic airport, Long Island, New York, running into the instrument landing system (ILS) antenna array and causing substantial damage to it. The aircraft, which came to rest on top of the ILS inside the airport perimeter, also suffered some damage, including a large dent in the nose.
27/05/06 ? AH-1W HMLA-169 USMC Crashed in Anbar province, Iraq, during a maintenance test flight. Hostile fire was not suspected as the cause of the crash. Both crew members were reported as missing.
26/06/06 ? F/A-18   USN

A Navy pilot was killed and another was seriously injured Monday when two fighter jets collided over a Central Coast military base, Cmdr. Jack Hanzlik said. The F/A-18 Hornet jets from Lemoore Naval Air Station were flying a training mission when they crashed at Fort Hunter Liggett, a remote Army Reserve base 150 miles south of San Francisco, said Navy spokesman Dennis McGrath.' The names of the two pilots were not immediately released. They were members of Strike Fighter Squadron 125, also known as "Rough Riders." Details of the crash were not immediately known, but a Fort Hunter Liggett spokesman said two parachutes were seen, indicating the pilots ejected.

26/06/06 ? F/A-18   USN

A Navy pilot was killed and another was seriously injured Monday when two fighter jets collided over a Central Coast military base, Cmdr. Jack Hanzlik said. The F/A-18 Hornet jets from Lemoore Naval Air Station were flying a training mission when they crashed at Fort Hunter Liggett, a remote Army Reserve base 150 miles south of San Francisco, said Navy spokesman Dennis McGrath.' The names of the two pilots were not immediately released. They were members of Strike Fighter Squadron 125, also known as "Rough Riders." Details of the crash were not immediately known, but a Fort Hunter Liggett spokesman said two parachutes were seen, indicating the pilots ejected.

02/07/06 ? AV-8B   USMC A Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier II jet crashed Sunday while attempting to land on the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima in the Mediterranean Sea north of Crete.The pilot, whom officials haven't named, ejected from the single-seat aircraft and was rescued within eight minutes, suffering only "minimal injuries," according to a Navy press release. The cause of the crash is under investigation. The aircraft and pilot are part of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, which is embarked on the Iwo Jima and its seven-ship group. The aircraft was taking part in a routine training exercise when it crashed. The Iwo Jima group is one month into a six-month deployment to the Middle East in support of maritime security operations, according to the release.The Harrier, which is used by the Marine Corps for air-to-ground and air-to-air missions, can take off and land vertically from ships and land. The service has seven operational squadrons of Harriers with 16 aircraft each, and one training squadron.
30/11/06 163471 F/A-18C VMFAT-101 USMC Smoke billows from the site where an F-18 Hornet crashed at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in California on Thursday. - Sandy Huffaker / AP Photo SAN DIEGO - A pilot was safe Thursday after he ejected from an F/A-18D Hornet fighter jet over Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, officials said. The pilot, whose name was not released, ejected from the two-seat jet before it crashed about 12:15 p.m. into a brushy area three miles east of the Miramar flight line, an air station spokesman said. No buildings or homes were affected. The pilot was taken to Scripps Memorial Hospital in nearby La Jolla, where the officer was being treated for what Maj. Jason Johnston, an air station spokesman, described as "just bumps, bruises." The jet belongs to the "Sharpshooters" of Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 101, one of three joint Marine-Navy squadrons that train aircrews on the Hornet. The pilot was flying the twin-seat "Delta" model solo, although it was not clear why. The twin-seat jet typically is used by the squadron as a trainer to instruct student pilots, although the Corps also flies operational versions of the Delta model with a glass digital cockpit, forward-looking infrared radar and advanced communications and navigation systems. The crash happened on a clear day in an area east of Interstate 15 known as East Miramar. It started a small brushfire, but fire-fighters were able to extinguish it quickly, officials said. The cause of the crash is under investigation, Johnston said.
03/12/06 156459 /YW-13 CH-46E HMM-165 USMC Emergency landing in Iraq
11/12/06 164785 CH-53E HMH-465 USMC Crash landed in Iraq
 

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